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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 833 (some duplicates have been removed)
measure of the size and strength of the economy in america. the reading of the gross domestic product shows the economy grew at a rate of 1 1/3 percent for the quarter down the previous reading of 1.7%. much of the change due to poor farm production in the midwest because of a severe drought. the dow jones industrial average broke a four-day losing streak on thursday with the best day in two weeks after fresh concerns about europe eased. the markets were down, however, on friday. consumer confidence jumped to the highest level in seven months in september. the conference board said the index rose 10% from august. the indicator is closely watched because consumer spending makes up 70% of the u.s. economy. >>> two important pieces of data for the housing mark were out. sales of new homes in august were down from july. the median price of a home rose by a record amount, 11%. pending home sales down slightly in the month of august. at least in part due to an inventory shortage. not enough homes available at the low end of the price range. >>> an apology from the apple ceo tim cook writing
, and the economy will be front and center. what are the important economic numbers to listen for? >> susie: and metro p.c.s. says "hello" to t-mobile, in a merger that will make t-mobile the fourth largest wireless carrier in the country. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: private sector hiring was surprisingly perky in september. that's according to data out just two days before the government's crucial and more complete monthly jobs report. payroll processor a.d.p. said employers added 162,000 jobs last month, stronger than expected. but the pace is slowing, and numbers for july and august were revised lower. still, there are signs the job market is improving, but no where close to replenishing the jobs lost in the great recession. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: few things would make more americans happy than a healthy job market. from recent college grads to president obama, their future might look more certain if companies really ramped up hiring. economists say there's too much uncertainty on the horizon for that to happen any time soon. the good news is that fi
of heated conversation on the economy. out of six 15-minute segments, 3 will focus on the nation's finances. the economy remains a top issue for voters. and many americans are anticipating a victory from the president. pew research reports 51% of voters say they think obama will win in tonight's broadcast. an analyst with the sunlight foundation tells first business that the pressure is on for the romney campaign. "in the polls it looks like romney is falling behind and falling further behind in the battleground states. although nationally it's a very close election, he's been hammered in the battleground states. the debates can be a great equalizer for him, but also that increases the pressure on him, whereas i think we are going to see barack obama playing a lot more defense." that was bill allison of the sunlight foundation. at long last, a wall street firm is being sued for fraud in connection with the housing crash. the suit was filed monday by the new york attorney general. the lawsuit holds jp morgan chase responsible for action by wall street firm bear stearns, which it acquired in
because the economy in ohio is doing better than it is in other parts of the country. >> it is and the question is, who gets the credit ryan joins me now along with roland martin. roland, that was the kind of, you're not afraid to say what you think. a kick in the you know, at least they're saying they feel the way they feel. >> actually, honesty is always the best policy. it's amazing they are making sarah palin out to look like a you know, profit, if you will, when she said they should go rogue. they're going to have to get more aggressive in this campaign in order to close this gap. these debates are going to be critical, but again, these ceo frankly is giving a muddy story if you will as to why he should be the person. i love boxing, erin and they say you don't win the belt of the champion on points. you take it and mitt romney hasn't done that. he has to take it if he wants to win the presidency. >> it makes sense, but ryan, what in the world is he supposed to do? it sounds like he tried to be aggressive. after the attacks on the consulate in libya. he came out a
all out in september, a hopeful sign that the u.s. economy may be picking up. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. ben bernanke defends his strategy at the federal reserve to do more to help the economy. >> susie: and how technology is making it possible for doctors to go paperless. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the first day of the new quarter, kicks off with a blue chip rally. investors were encouraged by a report showing that american factories were busy in september. a popular index of national factory activity rose to 51.5 last month, from 49.6 in august. it was the fastest pace of production since may. but that upbeat news was overshadowed by comments from federal reserve chief ben bernanke, saying the economy is not growing fast enough to bring down the unemployment rate. we'll have more on that in a moment. those two events led to volatile trading here on wall street. the dow rose about 78 points, but was up as much as 155 points earlier. the nasdaq drifted in and out of positive and negative territory, finally losing more than 2.5 points, and the s&p rose almost fo
questions after his speech. let's listen in. >> japan, of course, is the first modern economy to be trapped at the zero bound. interest rates close to zero. their experience foreshadowed the global financial crisis of 2008. the japanese had a stock market booming bust and a property boom and bust together which was roughly double the size, proportionally speaking, to the united states. it was a major shock to the economy. they have responded to it to a variety of tools. i think a couple things that we learned from watching their experience and troubles and difficulties they have been through and to that i would point to that we have tried to learn from them, the first is, aggressiveness, early aggressiveness of monetary policy. what we learned from japan is we learned from the 1930s. once you have a deflation, prices dropping, prices and wages are dropping, they can be very very hard to get out of that. there is a lot of downward pressure on the economy. we were very aggressive early on in the united states to avoid deflation and we have maintained inflation close to our 2% target which is
continue rising and consumers become more confident-- two bright spots of the economy. was the bank bailout overdone? hear what a former top regulator says about the rescue. former fdic chairman sheila bair joins us. and if american airlines and its pilots strike a deal tomorrow, it could mean fewer delays for customers and the company's bankruptcy. that and more tonight on nbr! captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: some encouraging news tonight for the housing market and consumer confidence. first, housing-- a measurement of prices in 20 cities across the country rose four tenths of a percent in july. that's the sixth straight month of gains for the s&p case- shiller home price index. and consumer's are feeling more optimistic. the conference board's confidence index rose to 70.3 in september, marking its highest level since february. these two groups, consumers and housing, are significant because of their influence over the entire economy. >> with the improvement in consumer confidence, we think that consumer spending could pick up as we go into next year. especially since the housing mar
on it to ease its mounting losses. the u.s. economy shows more signs of slowing, and slowing down faster than expected. but silver has been red hot. where is the demand coming from and can it last? we talk with phil baker, the c.e.o. of hecla mining. that and more tonight on nbr! we begin with discouraging news about the sluggish economy. by the broadest measurement, economic growth slowed sharply in the second quarter. the gross domestic product was revised considerably lower today. growth was 1.3% in the april through june period. just a month ago, the estimate was 1.7%. add that to a big drop in purchases of big ticket items, like washing machines and furniture. in august, durable goods orders fell 13.2%, and you've got an economy that's just muddling along. but one ray of encouragement-- fewer people filed for unemployment benefits for the first time last week. claims fell by 26,000 to their july lows of 359,000 claims. on wall street, the dow jumped 72 points, the nasdaq added almost 43 points, the s&p up 13. while the u.s. continues working through problems left over by the great recess
president obama. but mitt isn't having it, trying to get ohio voters to the right by focusing on the economy. >> with incomes going down, every year, every year going down, down, down. prices of electricity up and health insurance up and the cost of gasoline, having doubled, these are tough times. even for families with jobs. i know what it takes to get this economy going again. cheryl: so what would a tax plan under a romney/ryan administration look like? rich edson breaks it down for us. rich? >> reporter: well, cheryl, democrats call it a giveaway to the rich at the expense of the middle class. republicans say they're wrong, and this morning governor romney defended his tax plan. >> by the way, don't be expecting a huge cut in taxes because i'm also going to lower deductions and exemptions. by bringing rates down, we'll be able to let small businesses keep more of their money to hire more people. >> in the end the details are really up to congress. romney's proposed cutting every tax rate by 20%. to insure the treasury department takes in about the same amount of money under a new system,
is expected to attack the president on economy, and foreign policy and so far we have not seen what he will do for a second term. so, what do you anticipate the president will have to do, jehmu, in order to get ahead of this foreign policy gap that's going on right now in the wake of the death of four great americans. i don't know, kelly, i disagree with you. we haven't seen from president obama what his next four years would be, we have not seen anything from governor romney on what his business-- his presidency would look like, all he's done is attack the-- >> during the debate. >> what he will do during the debate i think is remind the american people of his record on counterterrorism, and that is not something that governor romney is going to be able to poke any holes in, and i think he will also remind the american people of when it comes to the economy, that it's the turn around is going to take time. >> oh. >> and you've seen president clinton talk about why it took eight years to get us surpluses and i think it will be finally clear, because, unfortunately. >> jehmu. >> the media has f
that was elected on enormous upsurge, hope and change in 2008. economy the sour. he has to recapture that and explain to the american people why they should waited longer for hope and change. >> jamie: what do you think is the most critical question that each of them has to be asked and answered? >> for mitt romney, think it's going to be, do you have a plan that is going to be any better than what we have now? how specifically will you get the economy moving and jobs created? it's one thing to criticize the president but what are you going to do. for the president, all the economic advisors said it was going to be better now. what miscalculations were made. the president's speech in charlotte wasn't specific. what specifically is going to second term going to be different. >> jamie: it was pretty safe bet the question of foreign policy would be answered by president obama with discussions of getting bin laden and beginning to withdraw troops. the fact that we have not had a major attack here on our soil. when it comes to that what about libya and impact on the president and his abil
: nicole thank you. dagen: take a look at this. the u.s. economy growing at a very weak 1.3% in the second quarter, revised down from 1.7%. that is, well, lousy. connell: deputy editor at the "wall street journal"'s editorial page is here to tell us it's always the economy, stupid, at least that was your column? >> that's right. and any presidential election one way or another it is going to be about the economy, no matter how hard the candidates try to deny that. the most amazing one perhaps of all time is indeed the incumbent obama who is running as though the economy during his term didn't happen or at least if it happened, it was the fault of somebody who was president four years before him and what he wants to talk about is the economy he's going to create starting in january 13 which will consist of people having green jobs, making windmills and solar panels. i think the american voters are probably getting a little bit frustrated that no one will talk about the economy as it exists right now, dropping to 1.3% in the second quarter. the united states economy is barely, barely moving.
, as the presidential candidates focus on the economy, what do the mixed signals mean? we get perspective from two economists. >> woodruff: then, we go on board navy ships in the persian gulf to watch a massive military exercise aimed at securing the strait of hormuz. >> we need to be prepared to deal with mines go in the water. this exercise is focused on the mine trip and demonstrating our able to clear mines. we have to be able to do that. >> suarez: the chinese communist party ousts a once-powerful politician and prepares to unveil its new leadership. margaret warner has our update. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: and from our "american graduate" series, we take an encore look at the story of an eighth grader who turns to journalism to tackle violence in his middle school. >> if i didn't have a-- i would probably be let up with the wrong people and doing the wrong stuff. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf and carnegie corporation. >> and with the ongoing support o
. on the issue that's supposed to be republican mitt romney's strength, the economy, he's trailing the president with a "new york times" news poll showing on the question of who can better handle it, ohio voters give the president an edge of 51% to 45%. >> i woke up every day doing everything i can to give american workers a fair shot in the global economy. >> there's danger signs. they declared ceos see slower economic growth the rest of the year with lower expectations for sales, capital expenditures, and hiring. the chairman of the round table, boeing chairman, said in a statement, quote, "the down shift in quarterly sentiment reflects continuing concern about the strength of the recovery including uncertainty over the approaching fiscal cliff." the sour report is more significant because he chairs the president's export council. >> i know that all of us, business or government, share the goal of strengthening our economy and creating more jobs. >> another vulnerability for the president could be the deficit promising to cut it in half by the end of the first term, but it's topped $1 trillion
in advertising revenue. this is due to the internet and sluggish u.s. economy. the firm has been taking various streamlining measures that include cutting 2,000,000 jo jo. 10% of the work force. despite actions, the company posted a loss in first time in four quarters. "the new york times" decided to appoint bbc general director as its new top executive. he is nonto have improved the web services of the bbc is is expected to bolster the newspaper company's online businesses. >>> british bankers association says it is willing to give up control over the libor bank rate. as it looks to prevent further rate rigging scandals. the association says libor is based on interest rates charged between banks in the london market. in june, major british bank, barclays was fined for manipulating libor through false reporting. a staement released tuesday indicating they would transfer libor related to a public body. by making the announcement, the association is seen as trying to ease criticism about the way the rate has been handled over a quarter century. and the british government plans to publish a final
scheduled debates. the topic tonight in denver domestic affairs including the economy, health care reform and imgrmigration and the clock is ticking. the election is less than five weeks away and the stakes are high. susan mcginnis is in washington. >> reporter: first debates get the most attention of all of them and the first 30 minutes are said to be the most important. president obama needs to hold on to the momentum he's built. mitt romney needs to turn the entire race around with tens of millions of people watching tonight. the stage is built. the cameras are in place. and the candidates are in their final hours of preparation. mitt romney took a break from his rehearsal to grab a burrito bowl at chipotle. president obama visited hoover dam. when we arrive at the university of denver tonight they will face questions about the economy. there will be six segments 15 minutes each and the first three are devoted entirely to the economy. >> i want to repeal obama care and replace it with something that will get the costs under control. >> reporter: how romney will replace the president's
, released about an hour ago. gdp, gross domestic products, our big picture economy grew only at an annual rate of 1.3% in the second quarter. i said before, that's stall speed. i mean it. that's very, very low rate of growth. 4% the end of last year, 2 1/2% early this year, now, 1.3, that's a nasty down trend. all right, the markets opened, we did expect an up trend, up tick in the opening bell. we've got it. 25 points higher, ultimately maybe 50 points higher within the next couple of minutes. i want to call this the iphone effect. nokia may cancel its dividend in the face of big time competition from the iphone. okay, nicole, where did nokia shares open? let's start with them. >> they're a winner today. up 2.5%, all right? up 2 1/2%. cutting the dividend is certainly not good news, but they've priced their knew lumia, more than the samsung galaxy so they're pushing a new phone now and that's where the euphoria is surrounding nokia. stuart: i've got to say i don't get that. priced the new phone higher than the galaxy and now it goes up. and blackberry, research in motion, that stock has
on persuading voters they can boost the economy. but a key question at the heart of it all-- is the economy slowing, stalling, or perhaps even gaining strength in some ways? new data are sending conflicting signs. republican presidential nominee mitt romney campaigned today at a military academy in pennsylvania. romney promised better jobs for young people like the cadets sitting behind him and a better future for the entire country. >> we're in a very different road than what i think the people of the world expected from the united states of america. and if i'm elected president of this country, i will get us back on a road of growth and prosperity and strength. >> woodruff: today at a campaign event in washington, president obama shared a message of what he called "economic patriotism" tied to a strong middle class. >> but our problems can be solved, our challenges can be met. we've still got the workers in the world, the best universities, the best scientists, the best... we got the best stuff. ( laughter ) we just got to bring it together. >> woodruff: consumer confidence is higher of l
views on the global economy and perhaps you could start with europe and make your way around the world and perspective on what you see in terms of growth and perhaps more importantly you know, what are the challenges that we are going to have to deal with over the next period of time? >> there's not enough time for all the challenges but let me give you some perspective. let me get to -- let me give away the punchline. the punchline is i think in a world races, the world is not going to come to coming to an end. we are going to muddle through but there are a lot of challenges and a lot of risks that i think the largest outcome come the largest for signage likely outcome by far is that we get through it and a lot of action were to be taken to offer some relief but there are several things that could cause things to derail in which case it would be a lot tougher for a lot longer. but you asked about europe. i think the biggest problem that europe has is growth and the risk problem is the go off the rail, bus stop of the euro. a few months ago we would have said that the two big issues fo
such difficulty, you know, in the economy because of federal reserve policy. likelihood of hearing this, very very slim. and maybe seeing how would you balance a budget? in our campaign we had a precise plan of cutting a trillion dollars and balancing the budget in three years. you know, we're in this horrendous crisis and neither one of them are going to say anything, oh, maybe we ought to cut something. there's no proposal to cut anything. it's also tinkering around with massive automatic increases and the american people are starting to wake up and realize it is all fiction and they are not serious. connell: congressman paul, thanks as always. >> thanks. connell: fox business network, beginning at 8:00 p.m. eastern live from denver, neil cavuto will be on the next hour to talk about the debate. neil cavuto. dagen: the economy will be a big focus of tonight's debate. adp the payroll processing firm came out earlier this morning and reported that 162,000 private sector jobs were added last month. more than expected. to weigh in on that, and the debate, the head of u.s. interest rate strategy at u
influential figures in the nation on the economy join us here on cnbc. >> we've got representative and hopeful ron paul with us. texas, from texas. he is of course outspoken about the federal reserve policies. robert reich is here with us tonight. also with us grover norquist. the man behind the no new taxes pledge so many republicans made. and bob lutz a former top auto executive. the auto bailout expected to be a big topic tonight. and we've got president of the aflcio. unions of course a major constituency. and roger altman. as you can see the lineup card is full. going to be great. >> absolutely. meantime our chief washington correspondent john harwood has made the trip to denver. what are you watching first tonight? >> what i'm watching for is how mitt romney takes advantage of this huge opportunity that he's got with tens of millions of americans watching these two side by side. he's behind in the polls, but not by an overwhelming margin. three points in our nbc/wall street journal poll. i talked to devine who was the campaign strategist for al gore. when gore lost the election, in the d
to become the sixth largest economy. perhaps it is no wonder that the british prime minister has come to town to drum up trade. he is leading a delegation and in the past few hours, he met with the president in the capital. but brazil faces many challenges. there are signs that its economic growth is slowing and inflation is on the rise. when it comes to education, brazil ranks 53rd in the world. it is an issue the country needs to address so it can seize its momentum not be left on the sideline. and downtown, there are throwing up the buildings at a dizzying pace. but it takes more than muscle to lift the country. all of this prosperity was built on natural resources but of the country wants to do more than supply commodities to china, it needs human helped to. >> you will not find many skilled workers on the streets. it is here in the poor neighborhoods, not far from the business district, that you find that challenge. if this country ever wants to develop from an emerging economy, it is going to have to do a better job educating its population. gdp but the six largest and blow in e
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 833 (some duplicates have been removed)